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Nate becomes a hurricane and heads to the US

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  • Sat, 10/07/2017 - 12:33
Hurricane Nate, Category 1, has strengthened in the last hours by reaching sustained maximum winds of 90 miles per hour in the center of the Gulf of Mexico and on its route to US coasts
  • EFE

Hurricane Nate, Category 1, has strengthened in the last hours by reaching sustained maximum winds of 90 miles per hour in the center of the Gulf of Mexico and on its route to US coasts.

Nate, which turned into a hurricane on Friday night and has killed more than 20 people as it passes through Central America, is located 180 miles south of the mouth of the Mississippi River, the American National Hurricane Center (CNH) reported this Saturday.

The hurricane is moving at 26 miles per hour and is expected that between tonight or Sunday morning will land with a category 2, meaning winds of over 96 mph (154 kph), somewhere in Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, states that are under alert.

Nate will also cause sea level rise of up to 3 meters in parts of the mouth of the Mississippi River and on the border between state and Alabama, and up to 2.7 meters in Mobile Bay (Alabama) and the west end of Florida, warns the CHN.

This rise in sea level will be accompanied by "large and destructive waves".

The US Coast Guard has established Yankee alert at ports such as Mobile (Alabama) and New Orleans, which means that due to bad weather, ships of great tonnage will not be able to enter the maritime terminal, and those who are anchored must take the measures.

Alabama and Louisiana are under a state of emergency due to the imminent arrival of this cyclone.

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards has deployed 1,300 National Guard troops in the face of a possible direct impact of the cyclone in a territory where the deployment of these events is particularly predictive of the 2005 Hurricane Katrina disaster that caused more of 1,800 dead.

In its most recent newsletter, the CNH has reported a hurricane warning for the portion around Walton and Okaloosa counties in the eastern tip of Florida, a state that suffered less than a month ago from the devastating effects of Hurricane Irma.

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